Recreation, Fish & Wildlife

We’re looking out for fish, wildlife, and their habitats everywhere we work.

Love the outdoors as much as we do?

Like many of you, we feel lucky to live, work and recreate in Oregon’s beautiful natural places. We know how important it is to protect these areas and the fish and wildlife that call them home. That’s why we take our job as environmental stewards seriously. Our biologists and environmental scientists do on-the-ground work to study and improve conditions for fish and wildlife, and we partner with agencies, non-profits, and Native American Tribes to expand our reach.

PGE parks and campgrounds

Get outside!

Find your new favorite spot to spend a day or a weekend at one of PGE’s many parks and campgrounds.

Protecting fish and habitat in the Clackamas, Deschutes & Willamette Rivers

We have a long history with Oregon’s rivers, and the fish and wildlife that they support. From helping fish migrate safely in the Clackamas to restoring salmon and steelhead to the Deschutes, we’re committed to keeping the rivers where we have hydroelectric plants healthy and safe.

Clackamas River

We help fish migrate safely along the Clackamas River while we power Oregon with clean, emissions-free hydropower. Our history here spans more than a century, defined by constant innovation and a strong commitment to preserve the fish, wildlife and natural beauty of the river for future generations.

Deschutes River

In the Deschutes River Basin, we work with the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon to provide clean, emissions-free hydropower. But that’s not all. We have another important set of goals that includes long-term sustainability for the salmon and steelhead populations in the Upper and Lower Deschutes.

Willamette River

In 1889, we built the first hydroelectric plant in the American West: Station A, at Willamette Falls in Oregon City, south of Portland. It was replaced by the T.W. Sullivan plant in 1895, which has generated electric power ever since as PGE’s Willamette Falls Hydroelectric Project.

Protecting wildlife in the air and water, and on land

Birds love to nest on power poles and other electrical equipment. But our avian biologists are on the job, working to keep them safe while helping to keep your power on.

The Metolius Mule Deer Winter Range near the Pelton Round Butte hydroelectric project serves as critical wildlife habitat for sensitive species.

By constructing side-channel habitat for fish, removing invasive species and planting native vegetation, we plan to turn our Harborton property along the Willamette river into a haven for wildlife.

Find information here about what fish we’re currently seeing at our hydropower projects on the Clackamas, Deschutes, and Willamette Rivers.